Reading, Writing

The Myth of Learning to Read vs. Reading to Learn

My formal educational training has primarily been geared toward teaching college students. I have extensive training in teaching different populations of college students: traditional, non-traditional, first-generation, advanced, remedial. But a lot of what I have learned about learning has been in the context of adult and teen learners. So when I started homeschooling, I also… Continue reading The Myth of Learning to Read vs. Reading to Learn

Literature

You’re Never Too Old for a Read-Aloud!

Every night, my husband and I spend thirty minutes reading each other poetry or great works of literature--just kidding! Between general parenting, homeschooling, housekeeping, working, and having to tell each other highlights from the day's news stories that the other one already read (because the pleasure is not in the knowing, but the telling), we are… Continue reading You’re Never Too Old for a Read-Aloud!

Writing

Dreams for Dayla Learning Curriculum (A Call for Beta Testers)

Do you want to know a secret? I've got some dreams for this site. See, I've been teaching writing for more than a decade, and I love doing it. In that time, I've thought a lot about what makes writing exciting, interesting, and engaging. When people find out I'm an English teacher, they usually groan… Continue reading Dreams for Dayla Learning Curriculum (A Call for Beta Testers)

Conferences

Attending the (Right) Homeschool Conference is Worth It

I spent last Thursday-Sunday at the Secular Eclectic Academic Homeschool conference in Atlanta, Georgia. I almost didn't go to this conference, but I am so, so glad I did. I almost didn't go for a few different reasons. The first was cost. When I booked my tickets, I was a month away from the beginning… Continue reading Attending the (Right) Homeschool Conference is Worth It

a map of the united states with pins in several locations
Process

Standards Without Standardization

Since we homeschool year-round (for all the reasons I discussed in a previous post), today is the first day of second grade for my 7-year-old daughter. To prepare for this "new" year, I did something that a lot of the homeschooling parents I know would shudder over: I printed the second grade Common Core standards.… Continue reading Standards Without Standardization

Process

The Benefits of Year-Round Homeschooling

I've mentioned before how my method for homeschooling revolves around both content and delivery. The tagline for this site is homeschooling the humanities with humanity because we found ourselves unexpectedly homeschooling when we couldn't find a good traditional school fit for my daughter's conflicting intellectual capabilities and socioemotional challenges. Homeschooling with humanity means meeting her where… Continue reading The Benefits of Year-Round Homeschooling

five metallic robots facing forward
Purpose

How the Humanities Will Save Us from the Robots

I am very excited to announce that I will be presenting at the Secular Eclectic Academic (SEA) Homeschooling Conference in Atlanta, Georgia in July! You can learn all about the conference (and get tickets!) here. I'm thrilled about this opportunity because finding the online SEA community when I first started homeschooling felt like a long… Continue reading How the Humanities Will Save Us from the Robots

Philosophy

How Much Should We Compromise? (Philosophy Activity for Young Children)

This is another activity that I tried with my co-op philosophy class with kids ages 6-10. (We also asked What Does it Mean to Be Free? and Why Do We Need Rules?) This activity starts with a reading of the book Elmer by David McKee and then moves onto an exploration of flexible thinking using some common household… Continue reading How Much Should We Compromise? (Philosophy Activity for Young Children)

Purpose

Why Studying the Humanities Helps Us In Every Career

One of the reasons that funding for the humanities is disappearing (along with courses, college majors, extracurricular activities, etc.) is that we're in an educational model right now tied to "pathways." If you're a higher ed professional, you've probably heard the word "pathways" so many times in the past few years that it has become… Continue reading Why Studying the Humanities Helps Us In Every Career

Philosophy

Do We Need Rules? (Philosophy Activity for Young Kids)

This is another activity that I tried with my co-op philosophy class with kids ages 6-10. (We also asked What Does it Mean to Be Free?) The books we use come from suggestions at the Center for Philosophy for Children, and then I add some hands-on activities to make them hold the interest of a young… Continue reading Do We Need Rules? (Philosophy Activity for Young Kids)